About

Digitome is revolutionary software in the field of non-destructive testing. The program takes data from two-dimensional x-ray images of an object taken at multiple angles and immediately allows the user to view two-dimensional slices within the object from any desirable orientation and position.

The system’s portability, cost, scalability, rapid results and ability to measure any aspect of tested subjects make it comparable if not superior to other imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Accuracy & Measurement

Preliminary results show Digitome can accurately measure lengths as small as 240 microns. Further, the incredible speed of the volumetric rendering, the minimization of data, and the highly accurate measuring ability highlights the revolutionary features of Digitome.

Example Uses of Digitome

One of Digitome’s exams was instrumental in determining the cause of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, and led to the solution for the return to space after the grounding of the shuttle missions.

Other Digitome Corporation examinations revealed that a music stand owned by Mozart had pieces screwed together with reverse threading, that the handle of an invaluable Japanese national treasure had been modified, and that the general absence of cracks in the intricate enamel of a Ming vase resulted from expansion joints on the inside surface.

An examination of a jet engine turbine blade revealed cracks that could have been dangerous.

Portability & Comparison to Other Scanning Technology

Though the Digitome exams are most easily accomplished in the cabinet, the mounting fixture and image plate are removable and easily portable to remote locations such as a museum for off-site examination of fragile or valuable pieces. To test its portability, the team twice this spring took the system to a room-sized x-ray vault at Central Piedmont Community College. It allowed them to do a test examination with a moveable x-ray source, whereas in the past they employed a fixed source and moved the object. The x-ray facility at the QAR Conservation Laboratory, where the Davidson team is working, is also room-sized.

The system’s portability, cost, scalability, rapid results and ability to measure any aspect of tested subjects make it comparable if not superior to other imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

About Digitome Corporation

Digitome Corporation is a tightly held 30-year-old business that has, until now, supplied its imaging devices almost exclusively to the defense industry and government-related organizations.

One of their exams was instrumental in determining the cause of the Space Shuttle Columbia disaster, and led to the solution for the return to space after the grounding of the shuttle missions. Other Digitome Corporation examinations revealed that a music stand owned by Mozart had pieces screwed together with reverse threading, that the handle of an invaluable Japanese national treasure had been modified, and that the general absence of cracks in the intricate enamel of a Ming vase resulted from expansion joints on the inside surface. An examination of a jet engine turbine blade revealed cracks that could have been dangerous.

In a unique agreement facilitated by Digitome Corporation, the college has entered into a sales agency agreement to sell Digitome systems and software to educational institutions and museums. Davidson will receive a percentage of the revenue on the sale. This is the first time Davidson has tried to set up a self-supporting, profitable entity.

“It’s a new venture for Davidson,” said Boye. “We received startup funds from the college to get the project rolling, but we’re expecting to be self-supporting soon. Revenues we generate will go back into the project, supporting student employment and training, equipment procurement, marketing and presentation of our findings at professional meetings.”